We Were Evergreen Review

We Were Evergreen Review

Last night I headed over to Bush Hall in Shepherd’s Bush to check out an upcoming band, We Were Evergreen. Unfortunately none of our photographers were available for the night, so you’ll have to excuse my iPhonetography! The venue was tiny, but had a great atmosphere to it. Despite it’s small size it has housed

May 30, 2012

Last night I headed over to Bush Hall in Shepherd’s Bush to check out an upcoming band, We Were Evergreen. Unfortunately none of our photographers were available for the night, so you’ll have to excuse my iPhonetography!

The venue was tiny, but had a great atmosphere to it. Despite it’s small size it has housed a huge variety of bands including R.E.M., Kings of Leon, Corinne Bailey Rae and more, and was described by The Independent as “London’s best kept concert secret”.

Before We Were Evergreen took to the stage their support act, Seye (pronounced “Sher”), took to the stage. The brother of Metronomy’s bassist, Seye has worked with a wide range of artists in the past, including Lana Del Rey, Emeli Sande, Ellie Goulding, Paloma Faith and more. He is now making moves as a solo artist, and based on his performance last night he is likely to go far. The Nigerian born singer had an infectious way about him whilst performing, and was full of smiles which found their way into the crowd. There are a lot of similarities between him and the headliners, We Were Evergreen, as you could see a lot of roots in Vampire Weekend and similar infectious indie pop records.

After Seye’s brief performance, We Were Evergreen took to the stage. The French trio were new to me but came highly recommended after touring with Michael Kiwanuka, Ed Sheeran, Prince Charles and more. I spent a large portion of the gig trying to work out the best way to describe them throughout the gig, as their sound seemed incredibly familiar but I was unable to place my finger on it. Eventually I settled on “M83 meets Vampire Weekend”, as their quirky instrument choices (banjo, ukelele, toy piano, kazoo, etc) are fused with electro sounds to create a really fun and fresh sound.

There are lots of adjectives that could be thrown around to describe the band, such as “twee”, “cutesy” or “toy”, but the problem is all of these words come with somewhat negative connotations. Whilst they had a notable focus on fun carefree music, there were moments where they showed depth in both their lyrics and their sound. Their closing track provided a huge crescendo of noise which seemed more at place in an LCD Soundsystem gig, and one of their best known tracks “Eighteen” offered some lyrical depth which helped show their range.

We Were Evergreen are another great output from the country which has lead electro music for the past decade, but with a different sound that focuses more on the fun enjoyable vibes that Vampire Weekend have pioneered in recent years. They aren’t likely to change your world, but they may just make it a little brighter.

What do you think of We Were Evergreen? Have you seen them live before? Let us know in the comments!

About Felix Morgan

Between the hours of 9-6 I work as a Creative Technologist at Billington Cartmell, a creative ad agency. I’m obsessed with all things new, which led to me working in the innovation team at my company. I’m an absolute media junkie, and try and keep on top of all the latest music, films, TV shows and games, which prompted me to found Control The Riot.

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